September 25, 2019

Agronomy Update: Leaf Diseases & Farmyard Maintenance

BY Dairyland Seed
Bacterial Leaf Blight in Soybeans

Terry Jones, Eastern Region Agronomist

The presence of bacterial leaf blight (BLB) in soybeans is a very common disease that is fairly widespread this growing season. As with anthracnose leaf blight in corn, hard splashing rainfall, high humidity, fog and moderate to cool temperatures are all conducive to its development.

The presence of bacterial leaf blight (BLB) in soybeans is a very common disease that is fairly widespread this growing season. As with anthracnose leaf blight in corn, hard splashing rainfall, high humidity, fog and moderate to cool temperatures are all conducive to its development.

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Septoria Brown Spot

Dan Ritter, Central Region Agronomist

Septoria brown spot (SBS) is a disease we see to some certain level each year. It usually appears lower in the soybean canopy and causes little economic issues. The reason being is that it attacks leaves lower in the canopy later in the season. These leaves tend to contribute little to yield at that point in time. There are years where weather favors its development a bit more and it can become a factor. In those years it tends to be cooler and more damp. It is characterized by lower leaves turning yellow and brown spots or speckles on the leaf.

The weblink below has some additional information related to SBS and bacterial leaf blight.

https://www.canr.msu.edu/news/bacterial_blight_and_septoria_brown_spot_appearing_in_soybeans

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Anthracnose Leaf Blight in Corn

Terry Jones, Eastern Region Agronomist

Anthracnose leaf blight (ALB) has become a very prominent foliar disease for the 2019 growing season. Many fields were infected by growth stage V3 this year and it has continued to spread into the upper canopy later in the season. ALB overwinters on infected residue from previous corn crops and is spread from wind and hard splashing rainfall. ALB first appears as water-soaked spots with tan centers and reddish borders. Under warm temperatures and prolonged rainfall, high humidity or fog, ALB can expand to possibly defoliate leaves. Fields with ALB should be monitored for the potential for anthracnose stalk rot.

ALB appears to become worse in nutrient deficient environments. Possible management strategies include burying corn residue, crop rotation, avoid using susceptible hybrids back to back if residue was infected with ALB. Using a fungicide labeled for ALB for early infection may be beneficial. Later applications of a fungicide may also prove a benefit if the upper canopy is at risk of defoliation.

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Turf Management

Brian Weller, Western Region Agronomist

As September continues and moves into October, harvest has started in some areas with others still waiting for it to begin. Working in agriculture has not always been conducive to having a great lawn or landscaping. Late summer and early fall are great times to get a jump on lawn care for next spring/summer.

Besides the lawn, trees, shrubs and other perennial plants will need water and fertilizer to increase their lifespan. Watering newly transplanted trees, shrub and other plants prior to freeze up will help the plant overwinter.

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Brian Weller
Western Region
507.456.3034
Dan Ritter
Central Region
219.863.0583
Branden Furseth
Northern Region
608.513.4265
Rod King
Eastern Region
574.596.6721
Terry Jones
Eastern Region
419.630.3115
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